Buffett makes Forbes Celebrity 100

Jimmy Buffett comes in at #47 with 52 million in earnings on the Forbes Celebrity 100: The World’s Highest-Paid Entertainers 2018.

There’s never been a better time to be famous. The world’s 100 top-earning celebrities pulled in a combined $6.3 billion pretax over the past 12 months, up 22% from last year; 11 superstars crossed the $100 million threshold, more than double the number from the last two years combined.

The Celebrity 100 list ranks front-of-camera stars around the globe using their pretax earnings from June 1, 2017 through June 1, 2018, before deducting fees for managers, lawyers and agents. Estimates are based on numbers from Nielsen, Pollstar, IMDB, SoundScan, NPD BookScan and ComScore, as well as interviews with industry experts and many of the stars themselves.

View the 2018 Forbes Celebrity 100 List

Article on Buffett’s Margaritaville Empire in Variety Magazine

From Variety Magazine: “Jimmy Buffett Cashes in on ‘Margaritaville’ Brand With Restaurants, Spirits, More

Before Jimmy Buffett, “rock ’n’ roll” and “leisure” hardly counted as overlapping industries. British rockers might have done photo shoots at their lavish country estates, but publicly, for the most part, the essential rock maxim remained: Never let ’em see you not sweat. But it was Buffett’s genius — as a businessman, if not necessarily an artist — to play down the shiftlessness of some of his early beach-bum character studies and play up relaxation as an aspirational lifestyle. Cut to now, when Margaritaville, the company named after Buffett’s sole No. 1 pop hit, brings in between $1.5 billion and $2 billion annually.

The singer-songwriter’s last studio album, 2013’s “Songs From St. Somewhere,” debuted at No. 4, not bad for a pirate looking at 66 at the time. But as income streams go, new — and even catalog — recordings count as an asterisk on a pimple on the empire the singer has amassed as one of music’s savviest branding kings. In 2016, Forbes declared Buffett America’s 13th-wealthiest celebrity, with a net worth of $550 million, so Spotify royalties are the least of his concerns. Margaritaville’s physical locations clearly attract more than just hardcore Parrotheads; the company’s 70-plus restaurants, bars, hotels, resorts, casinos, cruises and vacation rentals draw more than 20 million visitors each year. And no one need leave home to experience a piece of Margaritaville when there are tequilas, rums, lagers, iced teas, shrimp, tortilla chips, clothes, shoes, bedsheets and pool and tailgating accessories designed to make the most landlocked hovel seem downright Gulf Coast-adjacent.

The ancillary branding began modestly but early with the 1987 opening of the first Margaritaville restaurant in Key West; it took until 1993 before they got around to a second location. Now there are 32, and that’s not counting the three Air Margaritavilles in airport terminals, nine Landshark Bar & Grills, seven Cheeseburger in Paradises and seven 5 O’Clock Somewhere bars. There are two casinos and the hotel/resorts are up to eight, with eight more on the way in the coming years, including a 234-room, 29-story property set to open in 2020 in beachy Times Square. If the danger remains that Buffett’s fan base might age out of the leisure sector, there’s some accounting for that with two planned retirement communities for the “55 and better” set, with Latitude Margaritavilles being developed in Daytona Beach and Hilton Head that promise a Buffett-esque headspace 24/7/365/∞.

Buffett caddies at U.S. Senior Women’s Open

From the Golf Channel: “Jimmy Buffett caddies at U.S. Senior Women’s Open

Jimmy Buffett has worn many hats in his career – musician, best-selling author, businessman, and now … caddie.

Buffett was at Chicago Golf Club Monday to caddie for Patricia Ehrhart during a practice round at the U.S. Senior Women’s Open.

Ehrhart was a semifinalist at the 2017 U.S. Women’s Senior Amateur, and she also works as the travel and event manager for the Margaritaville Surf Team. Buffett, of course, serves as the captain, and Ehrhart’s three daughters are competitive surfers.

But there’s more than just the matter of convenience: Ehrhart is Buffett’s niece.

A Review of Buffett’s Pittsburgh Show

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette has a review of Saturday’s show: “Jimmy Buffett talks to fans like old friends during Pittsburgh concert

Buffett and his Coral Reefer Band’s “Son of a Son of a Sailor ’18” tour docked in Burgettstown Saturday, drawing a crowd that stretched from the gates at the pavilion to PA-18 around showtime. One fan in the sea of Hawaiian shirts wore a cardboard sign around her neck that read “BUFFETT VIRGIN.” For many other fans, Saturday was a return to Margaritaville. It certainly wasn’t their captain’s first time.

“I can tell, oh I can tell,” Mr. Buffett said to the crowd a few songs into his set. “We’re gonna have a B-I-G T-I-M-E.”

The crowd filed in slowly while opener Caroline Jones played a stripped-down set alongside only a box drum. Pulling mostly from her latest album, “Bare Feet,” released on Buffett’s Mailboat Records, Jones sounded much bigger than her band suggested. Coral Reefer Mac McAnally joined the singer for his song, “Down the Road,” before Jones closed with her own track, “Chasin’ Me.”

Buffett and his 11-member band kicked off their set with “Livingston Saturday Night,” naturally subbing “Pittsburgh” into the title on the final chorus. Transitions between songs were clean both in terms of stage banter and physical movement. Buffett doesn’t look his 71 years — tan and fit, he bounced around the stage with energy, hopping during his songs and quickly swapping guitars in between.

When he addressed the crowd, Buffett talked like he would with old friends who already know the punchlines to his inside jokes.

Buffett wears his heart on his sleeve. He likes strumming his guitar, he likes beaches, he likes boats and he likes bars. At some point during the show, he lost his flip-flops (later in his set he gifted them to a fan), and when the sun went down and Buffett took off his shades, he almost looked unnatural.